Family

This page holds information related to Rainbow Family genealogy. Much of this work is in the early stages, but made available for those who are interested.

For the Rainbow line, Edward Rainbow, a silk dyer in London, born about 1745, is the earliest confirmed connection. We have both his apprenticeship papers and trial documents from the Old Bailey for him. For the Dawson line, the earliest confirmed connection is Samuel Dawson.

Rainbow Info

Edward Rainbow (1745-1827) to Geoffrey Arnold

  • Edward Rainbow, b: 1745 d: Jul 1827 4th great grandfather
  • Edward Rainbow, b: Apr 25, 1772 London d: Abt. 1838 3rd great grandfather
  • Elisha Rainbow, b: Jan 11, 1804 Chelsea, London d: Jun 1886 Brentford, Middlesex 2nd great grandfather
  • William Charles Rainbow, b: Abt. 1847 Richmond, Surrey d: Sep 15, 1894 Kew Great grandfather
  • Kenneth Wallace Rainbow, b: Sep 23, 1888 Richmond, Surrey d: May 26, 1958 HuddersfieldMaternal grandfather
  • Lorna Margaret Rainbow, b: Dec 06, 1915 London Mother
  • Geoffrey Michael B Arnold, b: Oct 10, 1950 Westminster, London Self

Rainbow Documents
The following are very early drafts – much cleanup required

Links to Old Bailey Records involving Edward Rainbow (1745-1827)

Edward Rainbow’s (1745-1827) Apprenticeship document

Edward Rainbow Apprenticeship

1762 – Edward Rainbow Apprenticeship Papers

Click on image to enlarge.

 

Dawson Info

  • Charles Dawson describes the ancestors of Charles Dawson, and his wives Emma Pearl and Ellen Cooper.
  • Charles Dawson Will Transcription of Charles Dawson (1811-1846), father Charles Dawson.

Charles Dawson (the elder) married Sarah Wise. An extensive genealogy has been done by a member of the Wise family. Here are some of the related resources.

3 responses to “Family

  1. Pingback: Edward Rainbow – silk dyer and receiver of stolen goods | Lorna Arnold

  2. John Lynn ( UKAEA)

    So sorry to hear of Lorna Arnold’s death. I worked for the UKAEA in the 1980’s at London Headquarters and came to know both Lorna and Margaret Gowing quite well, Lorna always had a smile and a cheery “Good Morning”

  3. Martin Shelley

    Saddened to learn tonight of Lorna’s passing. We became friends when she visited her our mutual friends Ken and Pam Binning in Beckenham and she was a delightful person to have in your life, full of stories of the earliest days of the nuclear programme. She was also very friendly with our three children who were quite young when they first met. She had a lovely touch with them, engaging them in surprisingly adult conversation despite their youth.

    I was prompted to investigate further when I saw her interview on the recent BBC documentary about Sellafield, and of course discovered she was no longer with us. My contact stopped once Ken and Pam passed away some time ago and my wife and I moved back north to Scotland.

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